Monday, April 29, 2013

How Does Modern Healthcare Touch Lives?


“There was a doctor who treated patients for 50 ps in your village. Do you know him? Is he your relative?” An old man who came for consultation asked my dad. “Well, he is my father!” my dad replied with a smile. Although I’ve not seen my grandfather, I have heard a lot about him. He died at the age of 45 when his eldest daughter was just 15 years.

My grandfather Mr Neelakantan was born in an orthodox Brahmin family. He did not even get a chance to do schooling. But he had a great determination and dedication towards society. In those days, Brahmins were allowed to gain knowledge of only Sanskrit and Vedic texts. He learned all subjects from his home in spite of the objection from family. Finally he became a medical practitioner. The medicines that he gave to his patients came from abroad. I don’t think our generation can even imagine such a patience and willpower. Later my dad became a physician after completing graduation in medical science. Today he has over 30 years of experience treating various kinds of ailments. 



Born in a doctor’s family, I was not able to spend my school vacations in hill stations or other tourist centers. When my friends tell me of the wonderful places they have seen, I used to feel sad during my childhood days. But today I am in a state to understand the pressure and commitment of a doctor’s job. Even if I picked a different profession, I always admire doctors and modern medicines. They are simply giving their life and days to serve others.

Again as a doctor’s daughter, I knew how to take care of health. Until a particular age, I haven’t tasted ice cream. Similarly we rarely buy bakery items at home. At times I have felt bad that I am not able to dance in the rain because of my health consciousness. Yet everything is fine and well for me till now. I am always proud to say the tradition of medical service will continue in my family through my brother. My sibling is a medical student. He will complete his course within 2 years. Though I am not into medical field, I am sure that I might also get blessings for supporting my dad and brother in their noble cause.

At this time, I could hear our phone ringing. When I picked it, a lady at the other end asked, “I called to ask if doctor will be there at home now. My baby is sick and so we need to meet him soon”. I replied, “Yeah sure! Please come”. It is time for me to clean my dad’s consultation room and welcome a fellow mother and her baby. 

(This post is written for Indiblogger's "How does Modern Healthcare touch lives?" competition in association with Apollo Hospitals

10 comments:

  1. Despite the fact that the profession is marred by unscruplous practitioners who do not value human life as much as the cash they are pocketing, being a doctor and being able to be in a position to save lives is truly honorable.

    Good luck for the contest, Chech :)

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    1. Thanks Peevee. Nice to see your comment after such a long time :)

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  2. great post. I agree to PeeVee. Its the best form of humanity :)

    www.styledestino.com

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  3. Nice Post for apollo Contest..
    I have also written for the contest

    titled "10 Modern Gadgets that Will Change the World"

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  4. Good one :-) all the best for the contest :-)

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  5. I'm back at your blog after a long time, Roopz. Maybe because I was away from blogging for a while (and I still am, almost) thinking I'd to listen and learn a lot before I speak out.It was the title of the post that attracted me in the first place, myself being addicted to medical sciences. Thank you loads, for introducing me to your grand father. I had always wanted to make it to a med school, learn and practice medicine. I couldn't make it to the med school especially because of my abstinence to Physics and Math during my high school (The time which I used up reading the freshmen year books of the med school). I'm half an engineer now, who's spent 1/200th of his time with his academic books in comparison with the time spent in reading books of the med school. I'm one of those species whom you'd rarely find on this planet that uses up the money given by parents to buy his engineering books in buying med school books. (at least in the black market, when the price was higher)
    It's like I'm addicted to the field that I'm totally unable to imagine a life ahead where I can't imagine myself not wondering how distinct is the Meissner corpuscle from the Pacinian corpuscle.

    I've to blame myself for being unable to make it to the med school although. I felt like your grandfather used to be someone like me, for instance. (If I could get that right from your post: "in spite of objection from family.")

    As a person, equally interested in evolutionary biology and genetics I'd also like to add that, it isn't a really good decision not to dance in the rain because it's not so "healthy" a habit (although I wasn't allowed to run about in the rain by a biologist mother for the same reason). You can comprehend this with the simple logic, "Lactose intolerant parents procreate a lactose intolerant progeny."

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